WHEAT

SNAP is Safe ~ Thanks to You!!

Farm Bill Agreement Rejects Array of Harmful SNAP Provisions and Keeps Food on the Table for Millions of People Struggling Against Hunger

On December 11, the Senate passed the Farm Bill by a vote of 87-13. On December 12, the House passed the Farm Bill by a vote of 369-47. The bill is now headed to the White House for the president’s signature.

Cuts to food stamps are not in the bill. The most controversial element of the farm bill has been the different House and Senate approaches to food stamps, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

The House Republicans’ farm bill would have forced states to impose work requirements for food stamps on older workers, those aged 49 to 59, as well as parents with children ages 6 to 12. According to an estimate by Mathematica Policy Research, those proposals would result in benefits cuts for up to 1.1 million households, although conservatives and Republicans contest those numbers.

The final version of the farm bill made none of those changes.

No additional impact on the deficit. At close to $1 trillion a year, the farm bill’s price tag is high. But the bill’s drafters used the baseline set by the Congressional Budget Office under existing spending levels of $867 billion over the next 10 years, meaning it will not increase the federal deficit from prior projections.

Provides permanent funding for farmers markets, local food programs. The final farm bill provides permanent funding for a number of programs Congress was funding on a temporary basis, five years at a time. These include: promotional funds for local farmers markets, research funds for organic farming, and money for organizations working to train the next generation of farmers at a time when experts have raised concerns about the aging of the industry.

The bill also provides permanent funding for veteran and minority farmers.

Find out more about the Agriculture and Nutrition Act of 2018 – (aka Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 – H.R.2/S.3042)

Volunteer


volunteer match for wheat
Volunteers are the “Cream of WHEAT!”  Join our team and know that you are helping others become self-sustaining!  Click Here or the Graphic Above to Find Out More.

 

Fair Trade Chocolate

WHEAT’s Fair Trade Store only carries Fair Trade Certified Chocolate.  After years of taste testing, (it’s a tough job, we know!) we think the best is from Equal Exchange.  Stop by and pick up a bar or two ~ we think you’ll agree!

2017 WH Fair Trade Logo with text-01

THE CHOCOLATE FACTS

Chocolate. Milk or dark with Cornish sea salt? Behind every luscious chocolate bar and treat we devour throughout the year, there are six million people globally who depend on growing cocoa for their livelihoods. Fair Trade has breathed a new lease of life into entire cocoa farming communities in the poorest parts of the world.

  1. Most cocoa farmers live on less than a $1 a day. Poverty, and its many related issues, such as child labor, is the key challenge faced by cocoa growing communities. With Fair Trade sales, farmers are improving the quality and productivity of their farms, to increase incomes.
  2. 25% of all Fair Trade cocoa growers are women.  Women cocoa farmers in Côte D’Ivoire face many challenges and are taking charge of their own futures.
  3. Education is key to the future of cocoa communities. Fair Trade Africa currently trains cocoa farmers in financial management, governance, good agricultural practices, gender and child labor. This will form part of the Fair Trade West Africa Cocoa Program, being implemented over a period from 2015 to 2020.

CHOCOLATE & COCOA

Equal Exchange chocolates and cocoas are crafted using only the purest ingredients, grown with care by small farmer co-ops. We source from these small farmer organizations because we believe they are the heart and soul of the Fair Trade movement.

WORKER-OWNED

At Equal Exchange the workers all walk around like they own the place. That’s because they all do!  The co-op has over 100 worker-owners, each with an equal stake – and an equal vote – in the business.

 

 

 

Celebrate International Women’s Day – March 8

Gender equality and women’s empowerment are fundamental to ending extreme poverty and promoting resilient, democratic societies. When women play an active role in civil society and politics, governments tend to be more open, responsive and transparent. When women are at the negotiating table, peace agreements are more durable.

Neptune, Bobby (2016, February 18).

Women and girls are poised to be key drivers of progress and growth but they need to be empowered through equal rights and equal opportunities. They need to be prepared for a 21st century economy through connection to finance, digital literacy, science, technology, engineering, agriculture and mathematics.

And they need to be valued as leaders, peace-builders, and breadwinners in their communities and societies.

(2016, February 18). Empowering women and girls. Retrieved from usaid.gov.

WHEAT’s Story

When Jaye applied for WHEAT’s Training & Mentoring Program, she had years of experience working and always had to have more than one job in order to pay the rent, put food on the table for her 3 children and make sure they had clothes to wear to school. Jaye found herself in dire straits when she couldn’t find a second job after being laid off. For the first time, she found herself in line at the Food Bank, getting a food box and applying for SNAP. Jaye is a caring mother and wants the very best for her children, but she knew she needed to get a better job, but was afraid to give up the one she had. Jaye was underemployed. She was an exemplary student, always on time and always lending a hand to others in her class.

She excelled at customer service and relationship building. Her on-the-job experience was at a local non-profit agency, helping to guide clients to the right resources and services. When Jaye graduated from the 10-week program, she had many fruitful interviews. One she thought went particularly well and she was called back twice. She was getting a bit dejected, when finally the call came. SHE WAS HIRED. Jaye is now working behind the counter in a team leader position at a national rental car agency. They are providing her with benefits, something she never had before; a salary for a full-time position AND opportunities for growth in the company and advancement! Jaye has been employed and out of the program for 1-year and is now coming back to share her story as a presenter at WHEAT’s networking sessions for new participants.